Japanese Food Discoveries

FGL editorial stuff

FGL editorial stuff

Posts by FGL editorial stuff :

A Brief History of Japanese Cuisine: Enter the Yayoi Rice ...

During the Yayoi period (300 BC to 300 AD) farming villages sprang up, united in the highly organised, closely cooperative work patterns that the new agricultural system demanded. Even the gods got in on the act, as tending the rice fields became regarded as a spiritual act, a worshipful invocation to, Ta no Kami, the God of the rice paddies.

READ MORE

Meat Eats: Butaniku Pork, Venison, and Wild Boar

Buta is the pig, butaniku is pork. Eaten in Japan since the Edo period, the Yorkshire, Berkshire and Hampshire breeds of pig are preferred. In Okinawa the ears are served as a delicacy mimigaa while in Kyushu the carcass is especially prized for the tonkotsu pork broth ramen noodles from Hakata/Fukuoka.  More generally, however, it is eaten as tonkatsu pork cutlets, in pork shabu-shabu, stewed, or...

READ MORE

Su Vinegar, Ponzu Citrus Dip and Tsukemono Pickles

Japan’s own first vinegar, umezu, came as a result of the ancients salt-pickling plums. Its impact on the cuisine is reflected in the word anbai, literally ‘salt-plum’, which means spot-on, or well-balanced, especially in the phrase anbai ga ii, ‘this is just right’.

READ MORE

The Veggie Kitchen: Negi Spring Onions, Nira, Tamanegi And...

Negi spring onion or Welsh onion is very widely used, primarily as a nabemono or soup ingredient, or as sarashinegi an addition to tsuyu dipping sauces for noodles. In Kanto only the white part of the the shironegi or naganegi is used.

READ MORE

Konsai Root Vegetables: The Versatile Daikon Japanese Radi...

Konsai root vegetables such as daikon giant radish feature large in everyday cooking, especially in rural communities, in restaurants of all types and price ranges, and in Shojin-ryori Buddhist vegetarian-vegan temple cuisine. They also have much older folkloric associations with sexuality, the kon element of the phrase implying ‘root’ of life, and by extension, ones naughty bits, especially the m...

READ MORE

Kinoko Mushrooms: Let The Fungus Be Among Us

Japan’s climate makes it a fungi-lovers’s dream, with over 4000 species of kinoko mushroom and fungus, as many as there are in all of Europe. Many kinoko are edible, and they are all generally used in the same way, in misoshiru miso soup, as tempura, mixed with rice as kinokogohan, or in nabemono hotpots. They have incredible health-giving properties. For an in-depth look at that subject, stay tun...

READ MORE

Root Vegetables: Konnyaku The Devil’s Tongue, Lotus and Bu...

Konnyaku devil’s tongue, or elephant foot, is a tuber and a gelatinous paste from its grounded root is made into blocks, sometimes with an added ingredient such as red pepper. The latter is named kaminari konnyaku, lightning konnyaku (pictured on left), due to its fiery nature. Despite its sinister sounding English name, there's nothing to fear about this commonly used vegetable.

READ MORE

Sazae, Asari, Torigai And Baigai

Sazae turbo or spiny top shell is a strong tasting much sought-after gastropod, served as tsuboyaki in its shell grilled over a direct heat, from which your extract the muscle with a toothpick, or as sashimi.

READ MORE

Japan's Sea Fish Menu: Herring, Sardines and Horse Mackere...

The nishin herring is not as widely used as in Europe, though it is found most famously in Kyoto with buckwheat noodles, in nishin soba. Its female roe is dried to make the delicacy kazunoko, a favorite in New Year’s Osechi-ryori cuisine, while the herring itself is mostly served as humble shioyaki.

READ MORE

The Ritz-Carlton, Kyoto, La Locanda 's master chef Valenti...

Located in Japan’s culinary and cultural heartland, Japan's former imperial capital, Kyoto, THE RITZ-CARLTON, KYOTO, La Locanda offers world-class fine dining with a thrilling, innovative, contemporary luxury Italian cuisine created by the passionate, mercurial, master chef Valentino Palmisano.

READ MORE