History Blog Posts

A Brief History of Japanese Cuisine: Formal Feasting And C...

In 710, the center of Japanese power moved once again, to nearby Nara, where Empress Genmu established the new capital Heijo-kyo, near modern-day Nara. During the Nara period (710 to 794 AD) Signification and the development of Buddhism reached its height.

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Kofun And Asuka Periods | Influential Neighbors - Foodies ...

During the Kofun period, (250 to 538 AD) contacts with Chinese culture began to increase. Chopsticks arrived in Japan at this time. Initially they were deemed precious, and thus only used in religious ceremonies. Rather than the two cylindrical sticks we know today, they were split down the middle and still attached at the top.

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Moon in an Udon Sky | O-tsukimi - Foodies Japan

The Japanese have a special affinity for the moon that can be seen in their literature through the ages. From ancient times right up to present day it has captured the hearts of Zen monks, poets and writers. The oldest Japanese folk tale is the Taketori Monogatari, which is the story of a princess from the moon.

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An Edo | Tokyo Culinary Timeline Part 3 - Foodies Japan

1842  The rice harvest fails and in the resultant famine, the government decides to supply commoners with okayu rice porridge and financial assistance. Farm workers change their staple diet from rice to cereals. The sale and production of udon, tofu, soba and somen is temporarily forbidden, presumably to control profiteering.

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A Food In Edo Timeline | Part 1 (1603 to 1756) - Foodies J...

History of Japanese Food in Edo 1603 Tokugawa Ieyasu founds the Bakufu government. The construction of Edo begins. The Nihonbashi Uogashi riverside fish market is constructed to feed the builders and thence residents of Edo Castle. On the other side of the world, King James 6th becomes King of England.

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Tanabata with Japan's Romeo & Juliet... And Noodles | Summ...

Of All the Japanese Festivals, Tanabata Is the Most Romantic The tradition of Tanabata was introduced to Kyoto for the aristocracy in the Heian Period (794~1185) but didn't really become popular for the masses until the Edo Period (1603~1868). Today it is celebrated all over Japan but the dates and the way it is celebrated varies from area to area with some following the lunar calendar so the even...

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The Jomon Plat du Jour | Food That Is Dated, Is Still Plat...

A primitive Jomon hearth from Uenohara Jomon Village. Heated stones were used to ‘cook’ fish and vegetables. 

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A Food In Edo Timeline | Part 2 (1757 To 1836) - Foodies J...

History of Japanese Food in Edo Around 1757 As an important part of the history of Japanese food in Edo, street stalls selling tempura begin to appear. The vendors come up with an ingenious, though not exactly environmentally-friendly solution to cooking with hot oil in a city built entirely of wood and paper. They were located besides the river. In the event of conflagration the whole lot, flames...

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Eating In The Edo Era | An Intro to Vintage Food - Foodies...

There's a Japanese saying: Edo no rekishi wa junintoiro. Tachiba ni yotte mattaku. “For every ten people, there are ten versions of Edo history." As so it is. No-one however disputes the fact that the Edo period (1603 to 1868) was crucial in the development of the nation. Tokyo, as the city is known today, owes much of its identity and outlook to  events of 400+ years ago.

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A Brief History of Japanese Cuisine: Enter the Yayoi Rice ...

During the Yayoi period (300 BC to 300 AD) farming villages sprang up, united in the highly organised, closely cooperative work patterns that the new agricultural system demanded. Even the gods got in on the act, as tending the rice fields became regarded as a spiritual act, a worshipful invocation to, Ta no Kami, the God of the rice paddies.

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The Wages of Peace | Heian-Period Japan’s Food - Foodies J...

In 784 the Imperial capital upped sticks once more, and made the move, after a decade’s residency in Nagaoka-kyo, to the city that today we know as Kyoto. Back then it was called Heian-kyo, and the city gave its name to the period in which it served as the nation’s political, administrative, spiritual and cultural center, the Heian Period (794 AD to 1185 AD).

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