Teatime Blog Posts

Japanese Tea Ceremony - Zen Beyonce And Back - Foodies Go ...

No one can dispute the influence of sado, the ‘way of tea’, or cha-no-yu ‘tea hot water’ on Japan’s spiritual, artistic, cultural and social heritage. Trying to explain it in several hundred words is, as the sages might say, 'like hammering nails into tofu'. That is to say, muri! Impossible. But here's a try.

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Health Benefits of Green Tea

As Japanese green tea products fly off the shelves, in supplements, health products, toothpastes and shampoos, soft drinks and, naturally, in its pure leaf and powder forms, a multi-million dollar 21st-Century global health industry has taken Japan's favorite beverage to heart.

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Zen and the Art of Green Tea

The heart of Tea and the essence of Zen are one So reads the poster depicting a serene shaven-headed Zen monk practicing the tea ceremony at Shoden Eigen-in temple in the Gion district of Kyoto. Just streets away is the tourist chaos that is Hanami-koji street, with its shouting traffic police, speeding taxis and endlessly chattering tourists clad in rental kimono, scurrying to the next must-see d...

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Genmaicha - Japanese Tea - Foodies Go Local

"Irasshaimase! Welcome to our restaurant". It's a familiar cry to anyone who visits Japan. The formal greeting at most food establishments here is commonly followed by a welcoming beverage, sometimes water, but most often a cup of tea.

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Matcha, Bancha, Hoji Tea, Kaga Bocha, and More

The expensive powdered form used in the tea ceremony, and added as a flavoring to everything from ice cream to parfaits to Kit Kat bars, is matcha, sometimes termed hiki-cha. However, the common tea of choice for daily drinking is bancha, a coarse tea, invariably drunk hot, and often served free of change in restaurants. It is drunk to quench thirst, is inexpensive, and is made from larger, older ...

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Japanese Tea Ceremony - Zen, Beyonce And Back - Foodies Go...

No one can dispute the influence of sado, the ‘way of tea’, or cha-no-yu ‘tea hot water’ on Japan’s spiritual, artistic, cultural and social heritage. Trying to explain it in several hundred words is, as the sages might say, 'like hammering nails into tofu'. That is to say, muri! Impossible. But here's a try.

READ MORE

Japan's Festival of the Dead: Obon

Obon is a Buddhist event celebrated in Japan but it has its roots in India. They say that at this time of year the spirits of the deceased come back to the ‘real world’ to receive thanks from the living. Could explain the increase of ghost stories in the summer!!! The tradition was brought to Japan via China in the 7th century but it wasn’t widely celebrated by the general populace until the Edo P...

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Ocha Green Tea: An Introduction to the 'Efficacious Leaves...

For many, tea conjures up images of Typhoo and Lipton, a British stiff upper lip and a Boston punch-up that got nicely euphemized into a ‘party’. But Japan’s love affair with tea, the green variety, ocha that is, dates back to its introduction from China, although no one can really agree when that was. Some suggest the Nara period (710 AD to 794 AD), while another source credits the introduction t...

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Cha-no-yu Part 2: The Tea Ceremony. Harmony, Respect And B...

The Tea Ceremony is nothing more than boiling water, steeping tea, and drinking it. Thus spoke the great patriarch of all that is tea, 16th-Century tea master, Sen-no-Rikyu, and his word is both lore and law. Rikyu, and his adherents over the centuries, believe that a tea ceremony, unlike the aforementioned avant-garde Beyoncé-inspired version, must be infused with wakeiseijaku – harmony, respect,...

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Cha-kaiseki: Fine Dining for the Tea Ceremony

No, it's not a mere accompaniment to a cuppa, but you knew that, didn't you? Cha-kaiseki ryori is the name given to the strictly formalised, painstakingly and artistically crafted cuisine, that is served at a chaji tea function in advance of the tea itself. Cha-kaiseki, as it is commonly called, is the precursor to the more widespread general kaiseki cuisine that is typical of formal dining outsid...

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Green Tea, Sweets, Crowds and Martial Arts - 'Golden Week'...

Golden Week, or GW as it is commonly referred to in print here, is not actually a week! It refers to the series of holidays from the end of April to the beginning of May. The actual holidays are April 29th, May 3rd, 4th, 5th. April 29th is Showa Day to honor the Showa Emperor. May 3rd is Constitution Day celebrating Japan’s modern constitution.

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